Month: March 2020

Freelancer’s Guide to Cold EmailingFreelancer’s Guide to Cold Emailing



Now that you’re familiar with the screening process when looking for your potential clients, the next task is to get a hold of their contact information. The only information you really need is their name and email address. Generally speaking, this information will be in their “About Me” page or “Contact Us/Me” page. If you get a hold of the name and email, great! But, if you only get a hold of their email, keep searching for their name. Usually, it will be in the tag of their blog posts right under the title. If you can’t find the name, you can still email them, but your chances of going into the spam inbox are high because the email isn’t personalized.

Before sending your cold email, you should go through a few pages of their blog’s content and see whether or not you think you’ll be able to deliver content from a similar angle. If so, keep them as a contact. If not, move on. You won’t get repeat work or recommendations from a client that doesn’t agree with your writing voice. Once you have all of their email addresses and names down, it’s time to get to the hard stuff! Choose three samples of your writing that are relevant to the blogs you’ve chosen. Make sure the samples are absolutely flawless and portray your business and your writing style in the best light. After that’s taken care of you’re going to craft your cold email template.

Personally, I prefer using an email template because it saves me a ton of time. Just be sure to customize the email when it comes to the blog name, the name of the prospective client and when adding a bit of personality. Remember, to always add a link to your business website so they can look around and see more samples if they wish. I just write a general email template and leave the personalized fields blank. When it comes time to send the email, I literally just fill in the blanks. Below, I’ve provided an example of what an exceptional cold email template looks like. For demonstrations sake, let’s pretend I’m targeting real estate agents with blogs.

General Cold Emailing Template

Hi _______,

___________________________________________________________________

_________________________ Are you interested in hiring a real estate writer to produce content on a consistent basis for your blog? I’ve been a freelance real estate writer for over three years and have gained extensive experience in the field. If you’re interested ________, I can create blog content that is search engine optimized to help you build a local readership. Search engine optimization is simply a form of free internet marketing that will drive traffic to your blog through Google and Yahoo. Below, I’ve included samples of my previous real estate blogging work. If you’re pleased with my samples you can contact me for a commitment free quote.

All the Best,
Jazmin Espinal

Sample 1

Sample 2

Sample 3

www.capitalwebwriing.com

Personalized Cold Email Derived from the Template

Hi …

How to Decide to Become a Freelance Writer Full TimeHow to Decide to Become a Freelance Writer Full Time



If you are like many people who want to become a freelance writer full time, you have started your writing career part time as you still work your fill time brick and mortar job. This is a great way to make extra money, but you will not succeed in becoming a successful freelance writer by going this route. To truly build your writing career to its full potential, you will need to go full time at it so that you can make sure that you are giving your freelance writing career its all. The decision to become a freelance writer will not be an easy one, but if you use this process, it will make the decision much easier for you.

Step One

Start out the process on deciding to become a freelance writer full time by making a list of pros and cons. The list of pros and cons will be based around the idea of quitting your full time job to become a freelance writer. As you compile this list, you need to write down everything that comes to mind when you think about making this month. When you have put your pros and cons on paper when it comes to being a full time freelance writer, it is often easier to see the best decision for you.

Step Two

Talk to people who are successful being a full time freelance writer about your pending decision. They were in your shoes at one time and know exactly what you are going through with your freelance writing career. It is much easier to ask someone who is doing what you want to do what is the best road for you to take to get to your goals. These are the people that will know how to become a freelance writer and will be able to support you the best.

Step Three

Talk to your significant other about the decision to quit your full time job to become a freelance writer. You may come up against some initial resistance about your decision to become a full time freelance writer. Go over your list of pros and cons with the person in your life and tell them everything that you have learned about being a writer. Ask them to support the decision that you are about to make.

Step Four

Make the decision and stick to it. This is one of those times when you need to do your research and then go with your gut feeling on when it comes to you wanting to become a freelance writer.…

The Trials and Tribulations of a Freelance WriterThe Trials and Tribulations of a Freelance Writer



You love to write. It is your passion. You just know that people will love what you have to say and the way you say it. You intend to join the ranks of struggling freelance writers and set about making a name for yourself. The internet is an ideal place. There are so many writers out there, and they are actually getting paid. You just know that you can write as well as many of them and even better than most. You find a site and are on your way to becoming a world-famous writer.

Then reality comes to call.

One thing many new writers neglect to take into consideration is that writing just does not always pay that well. Okay, if you are Stephen King, you can pull down some big bucks. Even Stephen King, however, did not start out making a gazillion dollars per book. The internet, while a great place on which to write, can be especially brutal. The owners of the various sites are trying to make money, too. The way they do that is through advertising dollars; therefore, they are interested in content that will bring in those advertising dollars. Truthfully, they could probably care less that you have degrees upon top of degrees from accredited universities and that you could very well have the next Great American Novel locked up in your head. They want to know that you can attract viewers. (No one really cares if they actually read your stuff or not.) For this reason, most sites will pay you based upon the number of views you can draw to your articles. It does seem at times that they pay you less for views in order to encourage you to promote your articles more so you can attract more views. Of course, you do it. You need those pennies you are being paid.

Another thing that new writers seem not to take into account is the editor. You may believe that your article is perfect. Your editor will not see it that way. You really cannot spend any of your time arguing with them, though, because they are nameless and faceless. They are out there in cyberspace somewhere and may never read another one of your articles ever again. You see, you never seem to get the same editor twice. This presents another whole set of problems. One editor may tell you that you need more detail in your articles. You make the changes and focus on adding detail in future articles. A new and different editor comes along and tells you that you have too much detail in your article. One editor will tell you not to include any explanations of things that are probably obvious to the reader. Another editor will want you to explain every little detail. (I have tried to draw them pictures on the computer to no avail, so I suggest you not try it and just make the changes.) I had an editor tell me …

How Do Freelance Bid Sites Work?How Do Freelance Bid Sites Work?



Freelance bidding sites allow you to do several different things all on one site – the main goal is to provide a secure marketplace where a buyer can post a project, relay the specifications of the project, and give an estimated budget for completing the project, along with the criteria for the professionally completing the project.


Freelance bidding sites are usually free to register and their fees will vary from site to site after the free registration. What you get for a free registration on most freelance bidding sites is the ability to add your skills and often your online resume to their database.

Once the freelancer’s profile is set up on the freelance bidding site of choice, the forms and required information can be filled out to get started. Some sites will charge a fee for special services, such as uploading clips and work samples to the freelance bidding site’s portfolio, and some may allow this at no additional charge.

Many freelance bidding sites charge a fee to either the provider or the buyer and sometimes to both. For example, Elance Online charges a monthly fee, with discounts for annual and quarterly membership fees to the service provider, but it is free to post projects as a buyer. Guru.com also charges a quarterly or annual fee to use their premium services. With this fee, the provider (the freelancer) will be given a certain allotment of bids at no cost. After the freelancer has used all of their allotted free bids, they can then purchase additional bids either in bid packs or individually, depending on the site’s regulations.

Once the package and bids have been purchased, the freelancer can now browse the database for jobs or assignments that have been posted by buyers. When the freelancer finds a job on a freelance bidding site for which they are qualified, the freelancer can now place a professional bid for services, outlining the services they can provide the buyer and possibly provide work samples as well as their cost for completing the project.

The buyer can then review all the bids and samples and choose a provider who best meets their needs. Once the buyer has chosen a freelance provider, he or she will award the project to the provider with the best bid for the price and value of service, which may not always be the lowest bid. Once the project is accepted by the buyer and the freelancer, the freelancer communicates with the buyer, usually over a message board on the freelance bidding site, and then completes the work to the buyer’s specifications.

Payment arrangements vary depending on the cost of the project and the services provided by the freelance bidding site. Some freelance bidding sites have escrow accounts, where the buyer transfers the funds of the agreed upon price into the account to show good faith and then when the freelancer completes milestones or completes the project, the buyer then releases the escrow funds to the freelancer.

Freelancers can …

Freelancers Union Annual Independent Worker SurveyFreelancers Union Annual Independent Worker Survey



While independent workers-self-employed, freelance, part-time, and temporary-comprise 30% of the U.S. workforce, there is limited information about these workers. To help fill that knowledge gap, please complete the Freelancers Union Annual Independent Worker Survey. Survey results inform the public (see previous survey coverage in The Wall Street Journal and USA Today)and policymakers about issues that affect workers like you.

Based on data from previous surveys, policymakers have made concrete changes to help support independent workers-from reforming the Unincorporated Business Tax to introducing legislation (S8084/A11520) to help independent contractors collect what they’re owed from nonpaying clients.

Needless to say, the more respondents there are, the better the data is, and the greater the chance of helping you as an independent worker.

Here’s the survey link:
www.surveywriter.net/in/survey/survey937/2010Advocacy.asp…