Tag: Make Money Online

How to Decide to Become a Freelance Writer Full TimeHow to Decide to Become a Freelance Writer Full Time



If you are like many people who want to become a freelance writer full time, you have started your writing career part time as you still work your fill time brick and mortar job. This is a great way to make extra money, but you will not succeed in becoming a successful freelance writer by going this route. To truly build your writing career to its full potential, you will need to go full time at it so that you can make sure that you are giving your freelance writing career its all. The decision to become a freelance writer will not be an easy one, but if you use this process, it will make the decision much easier for you.

Step One

Start out the process on deciding to become a freelance writer full time by making a list of pros and cons. The list of pros and cons will be based around the idea of quitting your full time job to become a freelance writer. As you compile this list, you need to write down everything that comes to mind when you think about making this month. When you have put your pros and cons on paper when it comes to being a full time freelance writer, it is often easier to see the best decision for you.

Step Two

Talk to people who are successful being a full time freelance writer about your pending decision. They were in your shoes at one time and know exactly what you are going through with your freelance writing career. It is much easier to ask someone who is doing what you want to do what is the best road for you to take to get to your goals. These are the people that will know how to become a freelance writer and will be able to support you the best.

Step Three

Talk to your significant other about the decision to quit your full time job to become a freelance writer. You may come up against some initial resistance about your decision to become a full time freelance writer. Go over your list of pros and cons with the person in your life and tell them everything that you have learned about being a writer. Ask them to support the decision that you are about to make.

Step Four

Make the decision and stick to it. This is one of those times when you need to do your research and then go with your gut feeling on when it comes to you wanting to become a freelance writer.…

The Trials and Tribulations of a Freelance WriterThe Trials and Tribulations of a Freelance Writer



You love to write. It is your passion. You just know that people will love what you have to say and the way you say it. You intend to join the ranks of struggling freelance writers and set about making a name for yourself. The internet is an ideal place. There are so many writers out there, and they are actually getting paid. You just know that you can write as well as many of them and even better than most. You find a site and are on your way to becoming a world-famous writer.

Then reality comes to call.

One thing many new writers neglect to take into consideration is that writing just does not always pay that well. Okay, if you are Stephen King, you can pull down some big bucks. Even Stephen King, however, did not start out making a gazillion dollars per book. The internet, while a great place on which to write, can be especially brutal. The owners of the various sites are trying to make money, too. The way they do that is through advertising dollars; therefore, they are interested in content that will bring in those advertising dollars. Truthfully, they could probably care less that you have degrees upon top of degrees from accredited universities and that you could very well have the next Great American Novel locked up in your head. They want to know that you can attract viewers. (No one really cares if they actually read your stuff or not.) For this reason, most sites will pay you based upon the number of views you can draw to your articles. It does seem at times that they pay you less for views in order to encourage you to promote your articles more so you can attract more views. Of course, you do it. You need those pennies you are being paid.

Another thing that new writers seem not to take into account is the editor. You may believe that your article is perfect. Your editor will not see it that way. You really cannot spend any of your time arguing with them, though, because they are nameless and faceless. They are out there in cyberspace somewhere and may never read another one of your articles ever again. You see, you never seem to get the same editor twice. This presents another whole set of problems. One editor may tell you that you need more detail in your articles. You make the changes and focus on adding detail in future articles. A new and different editor comes along and tells you that you have too much detail in your article. One editor will tell you not to include any explanations of things that are probably obvious to the reader. Another editor will want you to explain every little detail. (I have tried to draw them pictures on the computer to no avail, so I suggest you not try it and just make the changes.) I had an editor tell me …

Time Management for Freelancers and Their FamilyTime Management for Freelancers and Their Family



Some people like to complain and claim that they don’t have the time to do something that they would like in order to make money at home. In my opinion, they just don’t want to find the time to squeeze in their moment “to shine” where they can showcase what they can do to the world. Since I have a family of my own where I am expecting a fourth child in January 2010, I try to make my small amount of time with my family with my writing and doing some household chores. Here are my suggestions on how to work this.


For moms with very young kids, it is harder to do but it’s doable. While your toddler or a little older ones are napping or at least watching TV, can work on your writing, web site design, etc of what you are good at. Try to use your time well such as at a doctor’s or dentist’s visits, games going on for your kids at school, while waiting in line at the grocery store as a few example.

If you need help with childcare and you don’t like the idea of sending them off to daycare, you can find another mom that would not mind watching your kids while the kids play together. Or if another mom you know works at home, both of you can switch when to watch each other’s kids. That way, both of you will save money while the kids get to play with each other.

If you have a spouse, girlfriend or boyfriend ask them if they would help watch the kids while you are working on yours. If they work outside of the house and make income, the least they can do is to help you with yours. They should support you with your home business idea no matter what.

If you have older kids, have them help you with the household chores. Since they are old enough to help out, they need to give you your time to work so then you could make income too. In my case at the current moment, I have a 8, 4 and a year old. All girls but my oldest can help me watch my two younger daughters. They can go play with each other like in the front yard if I am alone.

Another tip to point out is to work on them late at night after everyone else is asleep and wake up an hour or two. That way, you can get your work out of the way earlier in the day instead of waiting later on to do.

Spend a few hours or so with your family by playing games such as board games, make crafts together, do puppet shows or even go bike riding as a few more. As for the older kids, do what interest them in order to connect together as a family. Kids nowadays seem to not appreciate time with their family if they are …

Residual Earners for the Freelance WriterResidual Earners for the Freelance Writer



Freelance writing for any individual is an ideal opportunity to work for yourself, to set your own hours, to do what you want to do. The ability to communicate through the written word can be highly stimulating and lucrative given the correct sources, and along with earning money, many writers go away with a sense of pride and achievement. But writing purely for paying clients can often drain an individual’s creative streak and it is therefore important to make time for working on your own works.

 

Whilst many may think that they simply cannot afford to set aside time to work on their own whim, it needn’t be this way, as many websites offer payment schemes and bonuses for creative and original work. They don’t earn the big bucks that paying clients do, but they will earn you residual income. This may be insignificant enough at the beginning to make little change to your salary, but allowed to develop over time can earn you money whilst you simply sit back and relax.

Triond, one such site which allows upload of original content, works on a pay scheme based on ad clicks from your article’s pages. All such sites pay pennies compared with clients, but as your portfolio grows in size, you accumulate larger readership over time and you spread your articles across multiple sites, a generous residual income can be earned.

Try writing an article a day, of your choosing, on any topic. A speciality in one area may show an obvious niche market for your works. Alternatively pick and choose different topics, researching appropriately and uploading to your residual earning sites. Look at which generate the most interest and therefore boost your earnings. Choosing the correct key words, the correct topics and producing informative and enjoyable reads is as important here as it is when supplying work to clients. If anything it is more important as these works, published for millions to see, all carry your name.

The key to residual income is perseverance. There is no quick fix and there is certainly no quick cash. But for the determined writer who updates frequently, who gains an online readership both within and across websites, and who takes the time to write for themselves now and then, residual income can turn into a profitable earner.…

Times It’s Best to Deny a Freelance Graphic Design ClientTimes It’s Best to Deny a Freelance Graphic Design Client



Every time a freelance graphic designer denies a graphic design assignment from a client, twelve fairies drop dead. There’s absolutely nothing on earth that could make a freelance designer turn down work – or is there? Following are five times it’s probably best to pass your design client to someone else.

 

#1: You think the client might be trying to scam you

There lots of clients for freelance graphic artists to choose from (and fight other designers off of) but with the large number of freelance graphic design clients comes a large number of scammers. There are lots of scams that graphic artists may face on a daily basis and all of them should be avoided.

If you feel that a graphic design client is trying to get over on you, it’s best to deny taking them on as a client. Having a feeling that you are getting ripped-off means nothing if you allow it to happen. Follow your instincts because there are other fish in the sea, and you’d rather be safe than sorry.

#2: You’ve had a bad experience with them in the past

As a freelance graphic designer you’ll deal with all types of clients (with a wide range of different personalities), with the sheer number of clients you’ll have to face; there’s no doubt that you’ll face some clients that you won’t get along with all too well. When dealing with “nasty” graphic clients in your freelance business, you can never get done with the project soon enough.

It’s odd, but lots of times the annoying, nasty, or demanding client will be completely oblivious to the fact that you hate their guts, and if your work is good, they’ll contact you again and again for more work in the future. The money isn’t worth the difficulty and stress of dealing with these clients – deny working for them again.

#3: The client has unrealistic expectations

There are lots of graphic design clients out there that believe graphic designers have a magic “design button” that gets all of their design work done with just one press. These clients obviously don’t want to make your work too easy so they come up with impossible design goals that you’ll never be able to meet. They’ll want you to animate a still image, draw the back of their head (while giving you a picture of the front), or create a live website that reflects their every facial expression.

If you explain to these clients that as a freelance artist, these design plans are out of your scope (or anyone’s for that matter), they’ll just ask you to do your best (they know you have that magic design button handy). Don’t do your best – get out of dodge.

#4: The client is not planning to pay

There are lots of ways of telling whether or not a client is planning to pay you. If a client raises suspicion of being delinquent with the payment, don’t kid yourself – head for …

Becoming a Freelancer: How to Price Your Jobs and Make More MoneyBecoming a Freelancer: How to Price Your Jobs and Make More Money



As the economy lingers in a recession with little hope for a short term recovery, people who either have jobs but need more income, or are making a last ditch effort to find some income before moving back with mom and dad, should consider freelancing.

 

The next question obviously is, “freelance what?” It’s amazing what skills you already have that can be translated into cash whether you want full time, part time or even occasional work.

Many online sites exist that specialize in nothing other than freelance jobs. Most do require a nominal monthly fee to join. There is no long term commitment, no contracts, and it’s easy to “come and go” on these sites. For instance, if you are lucky enough to snag a three month assignment you can easily cancel or deactivate your membership (leaving all your profile information intact) until you need it again.

A simple Google search on “find freelance jobs” will give you plenty of options. The ones you choose should be ones that offer the type of jobs you want apply for. Freelance jobs range from writing blogs to full time engineering positions for Fortune 500 companies – and everything in between. Some are telecommute positions (work at home) and others actually require you to head to an office.

Again, figure out what you want to do and then these are the assignments you should target.

The trick now is to understand how and when to bid. Sure, you know what you’re worth and you know what you need to make to pay your bills. However, keep in mind that you are competing with hundreds of others, especially for work at home opportunities. If you are bidding too high, you won’t even be considered.

Many companies who post jobs online are looking for people to work for amounts that seem insulting. It’s a new game out there. And it does a bit to get used to. This isn’t to say that every company looking for workers wants to undercut you, but your chances of making what you think you are worth are pretty negligible.

Researching some sites over the past month showed me that some fairly large “real” companies are looking for workers to perform customer support services for under $4.00 an hour! Is this legal? Minimum wage in every US state dictates amounts closer to $7.00 an hour BUT there’s nothing you can do about this. Until you are hired, you don’t even know the company. You can’t complain! And if you get the job, you certainly aren’t going to file a complaint with the Dept. of Labor.

Bidding on and accepting one of these freelance assignments might even mean you don’t pay taxes on your wages. I’m not saying you don’t have to! I’m saying many of these online freelance jobs are short, meaning you don’t even reach the $600 limit that requires a company report your earnings to the IRS. By law you are supposed to report each penny you earn. …

Freelancing in a troubled economyFreelancing in a troubled economy



Everywhere I look, someone is talking about the economy, and usually in negative terms. Words are thrown around as though they lack meaning: recession, layoffs, bailouts, debt, stimulus. At some point, talk of our troubled economy becomes nothing more than noise.

 

As a freelance writer in Houston, my perspective on the economy is unique. Several days ago, my wife and I had dinner with her parents, and my father-in-law made the comment that our freelancing careers were the most stable in the family.

“You can’t get fired or demoted or have your pay cut,” he said. The man has a point.

Texas is “considered flat” with regard to the economy, according to ABC News. The state offers a relatively stable housing and job market. In Houston, the punches of a troubled economy are not quite as devastating as in other parts of the country.

Freelancing in a troubled economy is not much different from freelancing in a sound economy. I haven’t noticed a decline in work as a result of the failing stock market or the increase in corporate layoffs. I am not immune to our troubled economy nor do I exist in an ignorant bubble. Nevertheless, I choose to remain positive.

Two months ago, a client contracted me to write a series of 25 articles about our troubled economy. He wanted me to freelance these stories for a fairly generous sum because he felt posting such information on his Web site would help drive traffic. Not two weeks later, I was solicited for a similar project by yet another client.

In the past six months, more than 50 percent of my freelancing work has dealt with the troubled economy. Clients want articles and information about debt reduction, savings, retirement plans and everything else the average American worries about during a recession.

In a way, it feels as though I am profiting from other people’s misfortune. However, I choose to see it as an opportunity to help people who feel depressed about their financial situations.

Indeed, the troubled economy affects every business and industry in the United States. My freelancing clients are not limited to financial Web site owners or financial service providers; some of my clients are in the home-improvement industry, the retail business, the travel industry. They want to find ways to encourage customers to spend their money despite the troubled economy.

From freelancing to food service, a troubled economy affects all careers and businesses. But there are always ways to improve your situation. In many cases, it is simply a matter of approaching your job from a new perspective. Freelancing with a focus on the economy has accomplished that goal for me.

I’ve also found I enjoy writing articles about personal finance and business more than I did when we weren’t experiencing economic troubles. The idea that one of my articles might help or inspire someone else makes it that much more valuable, regardless of the angle or theme.…

Freelance Invoicing: Get Paid!Freelance Invoicing: Get Paid!



When you work for someone else, your paycheck is always expected on a certain day, and by law it must arrive. The security that comes with working a full-time job no longer exists as soon as you begin freelancing; it is now up to you to collect money for services rendered.

 

If you are uncomfortable with asking for money, or with billing clients after a job is finished, then you’ll either have to find another line of employment or learn how to do it, because a business can’t survive if you work for free. The trick is to come up with a set method of invoicing, and to make that method clear before you even begin working on a job.

Your Contract

If you provide freelancing services, you should have a contract – or agreement – that must be signed before work commences. Have an attorney look over the contract before you submit it to clients, and never start work until you have a signed copy in your hands.

The contract should state the method of payment, when it is expected, and the consequences for nonpayment. As long as those three factors are made clear, you are covered.

Deposits

It is certainly advisable that you receive a deposit before beginning a project. The most common amount is 10%, though some freelancers require as much as 50% up front. Whatever number you choose, the deposit requirement should be strictly enforced. Never begin a project without a signed contract and a deposit up front.

Example in your contract: “Before work on the project can start, a 10% deposit is required from the client. This deposit will be subtrated from the final payment amount owed.”

Time To Pay

Some freelancers perform large projects that cost thousands of dollars. If this is the case, your clients may want to set up a payment schedule. For example, if you charge $5,000 for a 30-page website, the client may want to pay you in $1,000 increments for five months. If this is an acceptable agreement, get it in writing and attach it to your contract. You should also obtain the name, phone number, address and fax number of each client so that you can reach them at any time.

Example in your contract: “If payment cannot be made in full, we will arrange for installments to be paid on a monthly basis. This payment structure is non-negotiable, and must be signed by both parties prior to commencement of work.”

Date Due

Your contract should state exactly when payment is due. For example, you can state that payment is due three days upon completion of the project. That way, you are assured to be paid promptly. If you are in any way unclear about this, you could be invoicing customers for three years before you see a dime – it isn’t worth it.

Example in your contract: “Payment is due three days after the final product has been delivered.”

Consequences

Your contract should also clearly state the …

Freelancing in CollegeFreelancing in College



Ah, college. It is a time where you’ll spend thousands and yet be terribly broke at the same time. Because of weird school schedules, most students have to find unique jobs that will accommodate to their needs. A lot of students will take up a part-time job or work for the school, however, with the recent economic downturn a lot of college students are having a tougher time finding an outlet for some extra cash. Aside from donating blood or other such instant cash schemes it seems as though most people tend to overlook the freelancing gig—it does take quite some time and work, but, what job doesn’t?

 


Another reason for the hesitancy might be the inconsistency that can arise from freelance work. While a part-time job will pay you every two weeks or so, a freelance job is dependent on how much time you spend on trying to make money. Or, perhaps there is uncertainty in how exactly a freelance job works. Well, this article here is a nifty little list of the pros of going freelance while in college! That way, you can find out if you’re ready to give it a try.

Making your own schedule. Oh yes, it’s true: as a freelancer, you will be making up your own schedule and that means deciding how much time you wish to put into your work. During those more stressful semesters at school, you can lessen the work load of your freelance job without the hassle of asking for less hours through management or trying to find someone else to cover your shift.

Building professional relationships. As part of a resume, everyone needs references and some future employers (especially for an actual career) will want to dig up those references in order to learn a little bit more about you. When you acquire clients for your freelancing gigs, those same people turn into professional references to place on your resume. Also, if you happen to become successful in your freelancing job, you now have established clients for credentials to get even more clients!

Using what you’re learning or already know. The biggest question that a student might ask (even me) is “when will I ever need this in real life?” Well, that could be now. Use what you learn and you’ll see it in a whole new perspective. Those economic and finance classes will finally come in handy when calculating rates and your hours of pay, and learning that new but boring software in computing classes can also be used professionally.

Gaining experience. Whether you’re working freelance or at the local coffee shop, it is still considered experience on a resume. But, placing “Freelance Web Designer” with some credentials on a resume might be a bit cooler, and come in handy, when applying for that web design career after college.

Feeling confident in your abilities. This goes hand-in-hand with the aforementioned reason in that with that experience you’ll also probably feel a bit …

Make at Least $30,000 a Year as a Semi Full-Time Freelance WriterMake at Least $30,000 a Year as a Semi Full-Time Freelance Writer



Recently, I have been receiving quite a bit of mail in my mailbox asking for advice on how to make it as a freelance writer. I’m not sure I’m necessarily the right guy to be asking; there are more than likely any number of writers here making more money than I, but I do know that anyone who is dedicated, has the time, and is a good writer can make $30,000 in the next twelve months without even leaving their home very often.

 

First the ground rules. In order to make $30,000 a year as a freelance writer-and of course, the potential is far greater than that-the first thing you have to have is time. Even if you are the greatest writer in the world, if you don’t have the time to commit to becoming a successful freelance writer, you are out of luck. As an example, I will use myself. I have a wife and children that I love to spend time with. Other than that, I don’t really have any issues with time management. I’m a professional loner so I don’t go out with friends. I follow Groucho Marx’s instructions on never belonging to any club or organization that would have me as a member. In essence, my time is my own. And since I would prefer to enjoy the little time I have left with my wife and kids, I choose to be with them rather than working my arse off trying to make more money to afford more crap I don’t need or a house I can’t afford to air condition or a fancy car that is going to break down just as much as my minivan. In other words, if I was unmarried and childless, I’d probably be writing this to tell you how to make $75,000 a year as a freelance writer. But I simply don’t want to work that hard. What I’m trying to say is that if you have the time to put into becoming a freelance internet writer, $30,000 should be viewed in terms of an average. Those want to pursue it as a part time career should be aware that they can pump up their annual income between $10,000 and $20,000 rather easily. If you want to be able to buy yourself a new car with the money you made in freelance writing this time next year you should be aware that it can be done, but you’ve got to treat it like a real job.

Now the second big question. Can you make $30,000 a year just writing for hubpages? Well, sure. I mean technically I can’t think of any reason why you couldn’t. It would just mean a lot of writing is all. In the past twelve months I have made over $9,000 just at hubpages alone, and I spend a considerable amount of time writing low-pay or no-pay opinion and political pieces instead of keyword-rich articles about MySpace and Fergie and thongs and other topics constantly at …